SCHEDULE for FALL 2017

For the agenda of discussion assignments, please click here.

The writing assignments are as follows:

Thursday, October 5, 2017
Imperialism and Anthropology
[covering Sessions 1-4]
Maximum length: 1,500 words. Worth 20% of the final grade.

Thursday, October 19, 2017
Globalization and Academic Imperialism
[covering Sessions 5 & 6]
Maximum length: 750 words. Worth 10% of the final grade.

Thursday, November 30, 2017
On Canadian Anthropology
[covering Sessions 7-12]
Maximum length: 2,500 words. Worth 30% of the final grade.

Our schedule of readings is as follows:

Session 1: Introduction

  • Overview of the seminar goals
  • Introduction to Canadian Anthropology and the question of cultural/academic imperialism

Colonialism and Anthropology

  1. Horvath, Ronald J. (1972). “A Definition of Colonialism.” Current Anthropology, 13(1), 45-57.
  2. Galtung, Johan. (1967). “Scientific Colonialism”. Transition, 30(April-May), 10-15.
  3. Lewis, Diane. (1973). “Anthropology and Colonialism”. Current Anthropology, 14(5), 581-602.

Session 2: Imperialism—History, Practice, Analysis

  1. Proudman, Mark F. (2008). “Words for Scholars: The Semantics of ‘Imperialism’”. The Journal of the Historical Society, 8(3), 395-433.
  2. Steinmetz, George. (2005). “Return to Empire: The New U.S. Imperialism in Comparative Historical Perspective”. Sociological Theory, 23(4), 339-367.
  3. Mudge, Stephanie Lee. (2008). “What is Neo-Liberalism?Socio-Economic Review, 6, 703–731 (or try this link).
  4. Hilgers, Mathieu. (2010). “The Three Anthropological Approaches to Neoliberalism”. International Social Science Journal, 61(202), 351–364

Session 3: Imperialism and Anthropology, Part 1

  1. Boas, Franz. (2005 [1919]). “Scientists as Spies”. Anthropology Today, 21(3), 27.
  2. Fisher, Donald. (1983). “The Role of Philanthropic Foundations in the Reproduction and Production of Hegemony: Rockefeller Foundations and the Social Sciences”. Sociology, 17(2), 206-233.
  3. Fisher, Donald. (1986). “Rockefeller Philanthropy and the Rise of Social Anthropology.” Anthropology Today, 2(1), 5-8.
  4. Walker, Charles R. (1945). “Anthropology as a War Weapon”. The American Mercury, July, 85-89.
  5. Tuten, Adalric Hilliard. (2011). “Civilianization of the US Military in the Era of Counterinsurgency: Problems and Prospects for Applied Anthropology”. The Applied Anthropologist, 31(1), 37-41.
  6. Borneman, John. (1995). “American Anthropology as Foreign Policy”. American Anthropologist, 97(4), 663-672.

Session 4: Imperialism and Anthropology, Part 2

  1. Gough, Kathleen. (1968). “New Proposals for Anthropologists”. Current Anthropology, 9(5), 403-435.
  2. Gough, Kathleen. (1993). “‘Anthropology and Imperialism’ Revisited”. Anthropologica, 35(2), 279-289.
  3. Lee, Richard, & Sacks, Karen Brodkin. (1993). “Anthropology, Imperialism and Resistance: The Work of Kathleen Gough”. Anthropologica, 35(2), 181-193.
  4. Jorgensen, Joseph G. (1993). “Kathleen Gough’s Fight against the Consequences of Class and Imperialism on Campus”. Anthropologica, 35(2), 227-234.

Session 5: Globalization and Academic Imperialism—A Debate

  1. Bourdieu, Pierre, & Wacquant, Loic. (1999). “On the Cunning of Imperialist Reason”. Theory, Culture & Society, 16(1), 41-58.
  2. Hanchard Michael. (2003). “Acts of Misrecognition: Transnational Black Politics, Anti-imperialism and the Ethnocentrisms of Pierre Bourdieu and Loïc Wacquant”. Theory, Culture & Society, 20(4): 5–29.
  3. Werbner, Pnina. (2000). “Who Sets the Terms of Debate? Heterotopic Intellectuals and the Clash of Discourses”. Theory, Culture & Society, 17(1), 147-156.
  4. Lemert, Charles. (2000). “The Clothes Have No Emperor: Bourdieu on American Imperialism”. Theory, Culture & Society, 17(1), 97-106.
  5. Friedman, Jonathan. (2000). “Americans Again, or the New Age of Imperial Reason? Global Elite Formation, its Identity and Ideological Discourses”. Theory, Culture & Society, 17(1), 139-146.
  6. Venn, Couze. (1999). “On the Cunning of Imperialist Reason: A Questioning Note or a Preamble for Debate”. Theory, Culture & Society, 16(1), 59-62.
  7. Robbins, Derek. (2003). “Postscript: ‘On the Cunning of Imperialist Reason’—Some Contextual Notes”. Theory, Culture & Society, 20(4), 71-78.

Session 6: Globalization, Academic Imperialism, and Canadianization

  1. Baber, Zaheer. (2003). “Provincial Universalism: The Landscape of Knowledge Production in an Era of Globalization”. Current Sociology, 51(6), 615-623.
  2. Guarné, Blai. (2012). “The World Is a Room: Beyond Centers and Peripheries in the Global Production of Anthropological Knowledge”. Focaal, (630), 8-19.
  3. Mathews, Gordon. (2010). “On the Referee System as a Barrier to Global Anthropology”. Asia Pacific Journal of Anthropology, 11(1), 52-63.
  4. CASCA. (2011). Report on the Survey of Canadian Anthropologists: Demographics and Opinions of Canadian Anthropologists. Fredericton, NB: Canadian Anthropology Society (CASCA).
  5. Silverman, Marilyn. (1991). “Dispatch Amongst ‘Our Selves’: A Colonial Encounter in Canadian Academia”. Critique of Anthropology, 11, 381-394.

Session 7: Anthropology in Canada

  1. Harrison, Julia, & Darnell, Regna. (2006). “Historicizing Traditions in Canadian Anthropology”. In Julia Harrison & Regna Darnell, (Eds.), Historicizing Canadian Anthropology (pp. 3-18). Vancouver: UBC Press.
  2. McKillop, A.B. (2006). “Disciplinary Tribes and Territories: Alliances and Skirmishes between Anthropology and History”. In Julia Harrison & Regna Darnell, (Eds.), Historicizing Canadian Anthropology (pp. 19-29). Vancouver: UBC Press.
  3. Hancock, Robert L.A. (2006). “Toward a Historiography of Canadian Anthropology”. In Julia Harrison & Regna Darnell, (Eds.), Historicizing Canadian Anthropology (pp. 30-43). Vancouver: UBC Press.

Optional/Recommended/Background:

Session 8: Canadian Anthropologists

  1. Nock, David. (2006). “The Erasure of Horatio Hale’s Contributions to Boasian Anthropology”. In Julia Harrison & Regna Darnell, (Eds.), Historicizing Canadian Anthropology (pp. 44-51). Vancouver: UBC Press.
  2. Nurse, Andrew. (2006). “Marius Barbeau and the Methodology of Salvage Ethnography in Canada, 1911-51”. In Julia Harrison & Regna Darnell, (Eds.), Historicizing Canadian Anthropology (pp. 52-61). Vancouver: UBC Press.
  3. Hamilton, Michelle A. (2006). “Iroquoian Archaeology, the Public, and Native Communities in Victorian Ontario”. In Julia Harrison & Regna Darnell, (Eds.), Historicizing Canadian Anthropology (pp. 65-77). Vancouver: UBC Press.

Optional/Recommended/Background:

Session 9: Placing Canadian Anthropology

  1. Dyck, Noel. (2006). “Canadian Anthropology and the Ethnography of ‘Indian Administration’”. In Julia Harrison & Regna Darnell, (Eds.), Historicizing Canadian Anthropology (pp. 78-92). Vancouver: UBC Press.
  2. Buchanan, Colin. (2006). “Canadian Anthropology and Ideas of Aboriginal Emendation”. In Julia Harrison & Regna Darnell, (Eds.), Historicizing Canadian Anthropology (pp. 93-106). Vancouver: UBC Press.
  3. Plaice, Evie. (2006). “A Comparative History of ‘Cultural Rights’ in South Africa and Canada”. In Julia Harrison & Regna Darnell, (Eds.), Historicizing Canadian Anthropology (pp. 107-121). Vancouver: UBC Press.
  4. Smart, Josephine, & Smart, Alan. (2006). “Canadian Anthropologists in China Studies”. In Julia Harrison & Regna Darnell, (Eds.), Historicizing Canadian Anthropology (pp. 122-136). Vancouver: UBC Press.

Optional/Recommended/Background:

Session 10: The Institutions of Canadian Anthropology

  1. Darnell, Regna. (2006). “Departmental Networks in Canadian Anthropology”. In Julia Harrison & Regna Darnell, (Eds.), Historicizing Canadian Anthropology (pp. 137-146). Vancouver: UBC Press.
  2. Pope, Richard K. (2006). “Canadian Anthropology as a Situated Conversation”. In Julia Harrison & Regna Darnell, (Eds.), Historicizing Canadian Anthropology (pp. 147-156). Vancouver: UBC Press.
  3. Whittaker, Eliv, & Ames, Michael M. (2006). “Anthropology and Sociology at the University of British Columbia from 1947 to the 1980s”. In Julia Harrison & Regna Darnell, (Eds.), Historicizing Canadian Anthropology (pp. 157-172). Vancouver: UBC Press.
  4. Tremblay, Marc-Adélard. (2006). “Anthropology at Université Laval: The Early Years, 1958-70”. In Julia Harrison & Regna Darnell, (Eds.), Historicizing Canadian Anthropology (pp. 173-182). Vancouver: UBC Press.
  5. Waldram, James B., & Downe, Pamela J. (2006). “Expatriates in the Ivory Tower: Anthropologists in Non-Anthropology University Departments”. In Julia Harrison & Regna Darnell, (Eds.), Historicizing Canadian Anthropology (pp. 183-199). Vancouver: UBC Press.

Optional/Recommended/Background:

Session 11: The Contexts and Contours of Canadian Anthropology

  1. Howes, David. (2006). “Constituting Canadian Anthropology”. In Julia Harrison & Regna Darnell, (Eds.), Historicizing Canadian Anthropology (pp. 200-211). Vancouver: UBC Press.
  2. Wilmott, Cory. (2006). “The Historical Praxis of Museum Anthropology: A Canada-US Comparison”. In Julia Harrison & Regna Darnell, (Eds.), Historicizing Canadian Anthropology (pp. 212-225). Vancouver: UBC Press.
  3. M’Closkey, Kathy, & Manuel, Kevin. (2006). “Commodifying North American Aboriginal Culture: A Canada-US Comparison”. In Julia Harrison & Regna Darnell, (Eds.), Historicizing Canadian Anthropology (pp. 226-241). Vancouver: UBC Press.
  4. Graburn, Nelson H.H. (2006). “Canadian Anthropology and the Cold War”. In Julia Harrison & Regna Darnell, (Eds.), Historicizing Canadian Anthropology (pp. 242-252). Vancouver: UBC Press.
  5. Van Esterik, Penny. (2006). “Texts and Contexts in Canadian Anthropology”. In Julia Harrison & Regna Darnell, (Eds.), Historicizing Canadian Anthropology (pp. 253-265). Vancouver: UBC Press.
  6. Amit, Vered. (2006). “Just a Little Off-Centre or Not Peripheral Enough? Paradoxes for the Reproduction of Canadian Anthropology”. In Julia Harrison & Regna Darnell, (Eds.), Historicizing Canadian Anthropology (pp. 266-274). Vancouver: UBC Press.
  7. Harrison, Julia, & Darnell, Regna. (2006).“Postscript”. In Julia Harrison & Regna Darnell, (Eds.), Historicizing Canadian Anthropology (pp. 275-277). Vancouver: UBC Press.

Optional/Recommended/Background:

Session 12: What is Canadian Anthropology?

  1. Sweet, Louise E. (1976). “Review: What Is Canadian Anthropology”. American Anthropologist, 78(4), 844-850
  2. Corrigan, Samuel W. (1978). “Sweet’s Canadian Anthropology”. American Anthropologist, 80(2), 372-374.
  3. Inglis, Gordon. (1978). “Anthropology and Canada”. American Anthropologist, 80(2), 374-375.
  4. Sweet, Louise E. (1978). “Response to Inglis and Corrigan: Canadian Anthropology”. American Anthropologist, 80(2), 375-377.
  5. Cruikshank, Julie. (2008). “Review: Canadian Anthropology”. Current Anthropology, 49(2), 353-354.

Optional/Recommended/Background:

Advertisements